Search Results for "virtual school"

Virtual Program: Dog Man BINGO

Dog Man BINGO! There is so much Dog Man love in the universe. This program was pulled from my Dog Man to the Rescue! in-person 2019 Dog Man event, with some minor tweaks to work as a virtual event.

This had a bit more interest than Book Character BINGO a few weeks ago, though I don’t think BINGO draws excitement the same way trivia does. We are experimenting with a weekly live after school trivia/BINGO style event in September, and I’ll be interested to see how that works out.

Looking for more Dog Man?

Check out Virtual Dog Man Trivia and Dog Man to the Rescue!

And discover other virtual school age programs:

Content

We played three rounds of BINGO, two where we aimed for five in a row, and a final coverall game, allowing everyone to get a BINGO.

Watch the video here:

All of the BINGO cards have the same 24 characters on them (plus the free space). I include a number beside each character image to help kids and grown-ups quickly find characters or book covers they are unfamiliar with.

Download the BINGO cards here:

I also curated an at-home fun packet, featuring an activity page for each of our book characters. Download here.

And, of course, a Dog Man BINGO printable certificate:

Innovation Academy: Virtual and Augmented Reality

I’ve been part of my library’s virtual storytime team for the last few months (and into the summer). Last week, I had a chance to dive into school age programming again with another virtual Innovation Academy program.

This was my second foray into a virtual Innovation Academy program. I received zero feedback from the first program or from this program, so I have essentially no idea what patrons thought of either event, or if they even opened the documents I sent. So it goes with virtual programming.

Read more about the how, why, and pros and cons for this particular program series in my last post on this topic: Virtual School Age: Coding.

Some details on how this series works:

  • Program materials are designed and curated for ages 6-11.
  • Attendees register via Evanced (our regular event registration software).
  • On the day of the event, the program presenter emails attendees a video introduction as well as a PDF with resources, content, and activities to do at home.

Innovation Academy Content

The challenge with tech programs at home is coming up with tech ideas that only use technology the average family is likely to own–essentially, a computer and a smartphone. Coding was an easy choice, but so many of my regular in-library programs rely on physical technology (3D pens, 3D printer, Bloxels, various robots, etc.).

Augmented Reality just involves a smartphone–something that many people may already own (or at least those people who are signing up virtually for a virtual event).

I wanted to make this program a bit more focused with activities that build based on your knowledge and age–starting with defining the concept, moving on to exploring the concept, and finally creating something on your own.

This was a great plan until I spent way too many hours trying to find a tool that allows kids to create their own Augmented Reality apps or games. This feels like it should exist, and it does in a few forms, but most of those forms involve (1) apps that are outdated/don’t work with the newest Android/Apple updates, (2) software that costs money, or (3) apps that are in development by Princeton and will be SO COOL in three years.

To allow for that “create” portion of the program, I expanded the program topic to “Augmented and Virtual Reality.” While you can’t explore virtual reality without a headset, you can create some cool virtual reality tours with Google that can be made and shared without needing a headset. Is it as cool without a headset? No. Does it still get the point across? Yes.

Just like last time, I provided an instruction video for participants:

Participants can watch the video, or they can move straight to the packet, included below. It covers the concepts reviewed in the video, and also provides a written explanation of the resources and tutorial shown in the video.

Virtual Book Talk: Grades K-5

Book talks are one of my favorite parts of librarianship. I love going into classrooms, seeing a captive audience of students (who may or may not be excited to see me–at first), and building a feeling of mounting excitement as kids learn that their library is full of fun places to go, fun programs to participate in, and a bunch of books that are actually really cool. My booktalks are packed with energy and popular topics. And I haven’t presented one in about a year. We reached out to schools about virtual book talk options, but while some of my coworkers have had luck, every teacher I’ve reached out to never actually schedules a virtual book talk. I’ve made over 100 individual YouTube book talk videos, and while those are fun, I don’t get to talk to any kids. Finally, (finally!) about a year since I was last in a classroom, I had the chance to talk to some kids virtually.

This presentation was definitely different than in-person book talks. First, I had a collection of grades at once: K-2 and then 3-5 (30 minutes each). Second, since I was presenting virtually with a powerpoint with images, I could pick any book. I wasn’t limited by what was on our shelves. Also, unlike in-person book talks, where we are scheduled to see the same class multiple times a year, this was a one-and-done experience for the school’s literacy day. This opened up so, so many book possibilities. I’m still not sure I’m entirely happy with my choices–it was simply so hard to choose!

The school also wanted me to talk about some other services too. Specifically, they wanted a library tour, information about library cards, and details on programs and services. This was much tougher than usual because the places and services I normally highlight on a tour or during an in-person book talk still aren’t operating. Our play spaces, video game room, and homework help center are closed. Kids can come in and use the computers, but they aren’t encouraged to come game with their friends for hours like they might have done in 2019. I can and did share the different types of books we have, but I wasn’t able to highlight much beyond that.

I talked a bit about getting a library card–which is easier than it has ever been–and about some of our upcoming virtual events as well, before jumping into the books!

Just like I do for in-person visits, I included slides with big images of covers and select spreads:

For Grades K-2, I highlighted these books:

The full K-2 PowerPoint is available here:

For Grades 3-5, I featured these books:

The full 3-5 PowerPoint is available here:

I think the content presented virtually was a bit too much for the students in grades K-2, but grades 3-5 stayed with me and even asked a bunch of questions at the end about the books I discussed, other books, and the library’s history.

It felt fantastic to be able to talk to students again, especially in a way that let me hear from them too. Hopefully, maybe, we will be able to do more of these virtual visits next year in classroom settings. Even if we can’t go into the classrooms, hopefully our local schools will be on a better routine that might allow us to stop by (virtually) more often than we could this school year. There are certain core elements of librarianship that are part of why I signed up for this job in the first place–and talking to kids about books is one of them. While I know these won’t be around forever, especially if I pursue a career in management or collection development or many other future directions, I also wasn’t quite ready to let these things go yet–so for now I’m just happy to have had another opportunity to talk to a bunch of kids about books.

Reader’s Theater: Virtual Edition!

Reader’s Theater was a popular in-person program, pre-pandemic. It was actually one of the last programs I ran in person, with our regular season running each February (learn more about in-person Reader’s Theater here, though the process is pretty similar to what is outlined below).

My Reader’s Theater kids are known for their energy, so I wasn’t sure what I was getting into by making this a virtual program. But, in the end, other than internet connection issues, the program was pretty seamless.

Before the Program – Script Prep!

Most of my work takes place before I see the kids the first time, and this was also the case virtually. Personally, I don’t use standard “reader’s theater scripts” that you can find on Google–they often feel forced or aren’t as fun for my 3rd-5th graders. Instead, I look for funny picture books that can be adapted to a reader’s theater style performance. I also have a stash of old Zoom Playhouse Scripts. The Zoom website is no longer available, but some of these can be transcribed from YouTube videos.

Knowing that I both had some new faces among my signups and that I wanted some familiarity, this year’s scripts included the titles below. Click on the links on the titles to download the scripts to use in your own program.

I plan for a full group of 15 kids. Not every kid is in every play. I select scripts that allow for 60 parts total (four per reader). Many picture books allow for multiple narrator roles, allowing me to tweak scripts to fit the number of parts I need to reach 60.

Once I have all of my scripts, I print them all out and highlight the appropriate lines for each part. Then, the sorting begins.

I sort scripts into folders before the first rehearsal. In person, kids then randomly select a folder without knowing what parts are inside. Virtually, I had to distribute folders out the drive thru window pickup service, so I had to pick parts for kids ahead of time. When I had a toss up for who should get a part with more lines, I tended to give it to kids who were aging out of the program this year (especially those who had been doing this a while).

To break scripts down into folders, I try to aim for the following:

  • 4 scripts per folder
  • At least 1 script that is a “lead” role (more lines)
  • Not all parts in one folder are narrator roles
  • If possible, spread scripts out based on the chosen performance order (not all scripts are at the beginning or end)

Each folder has two labels on the front with the parts of the performer and the performance order. I use three-prong folders, so scripts are hole-punched and inserted into the prongs.

Another difference: in person, kids would only get copies of the scripts for the plays they were in. Virtually, each kid got a copy of every script because I new we would have absences and drop outs, and I would need to assign those roles. In person, I handed kids the folder of the absent participant, virtually, I didn’t want to deal with sending links to virtual copies of scripts.

Some other practices to make script assignment smooth:

  • I create a master sheet for me, organized by play, labeling which scripts/performers have which parts. This helps a lot when 15 8-11-year-olds are paying zero attention to which play comes next.
  • I have a jar on hand with the names of each kid inside on a separate slip of paper. If someone is absent, I pull a name out of the jar to evenly distribute extra parts.

Reader’s Theater Virtual Program

This virtual program followed a similar schedule to in-person Reader’s Theater:

  • Week 1: Zoom Scavenger Hunt, Intro to Reader’s Theater, Practice Scripts
  • Week 2: Zoom Scavenger Hunt, Practice Scripts (continued from week 1)
  • Week 3:Zoom Scavenger Hunt, Full Rehearsal
  • Week 4: Performance for family, friends, and more

We started the first three virtual sessions with a Would You Rather question and a Zoom scavenger hunt.

Would You Rather Questions included:

  • Would you rather only be able to get around by hopping like a kangaroo or leaping like a ballerina?
  • Would you rather have ketchup randomly come out of your belly button or your nose?
  • Would you rather be able to only eat your favorite food for the rest of your life, or would you rather never be able to eat it again?

Zoom Scavenger Hunt Items included:

Week 1
1. Something you can wear on your head
2. Something with words on it
3. Something related to dinosaurs
4. Something with wings
5. Something that is meant to get wet
6. Something that makes a sound
7. One of these: rock, paper, or scissors
8. A spoon
9. Something bumpy
10. Something that makes you laugh
11. Something you really want to share
12. Your script!

Download PPT.
Week 2
1. Something you can wear on your head
2. Something related to food
3. A book
4. Something Orange
5. Something round
6. Your script!

Download PPT.
Week 3
1. Something you can wear on your head
2. Something that can hold something else
3. Something related to animals
4. Something purple
5. Your script!

Download PPT.

We only rehearsed one script at a time, so the kids who are not currently practicing are welcome to watch and give feedback, or they can explore some busywork packets–mad libs, dot-to-dots, kawaii coloring sheets, Captain Underpants Name Changer, etc. Download our busywork packet here.

On performance day, family and friends could use the same link to watch the performance. I asked them to mute and turn their cameras off (and did so for them if they did not), and gave them instructions on how to only view the performers on their screens. Everything went smoothly, with a great performance by all!

Reader’s Theater: Virtual Tips

I’ve run this program a lot in person, and I imagine everyone’s experience (virtual or in person) will be very different. Some things I discovered virtually:

  • A lot more kids came once and never returned or never came at all. This meant our final performers ended up with more parts–but it also made things a little more challenging to organize when we got to plays that had more parts than we had performers.
  • “Correcting” kids feels very different virtually. I don’t like to actively correct the kids in any setting, but in person, another kid would more often step in and try to help someone struggling with pronunciation. Sometimes, I would make sure I was seated in a spot situated near someone who needed a little more help reading (or someone who struggled to pay attention to a long script). Virtually, other than through chat, it isn’t really doable to whisper something to one kid without everyone hearing. I mainly only stepped in if someone was really having microphone issues or internet connection problems.
  • Speaking of internet connection problems: they persist, kids can’t always solve the problems on their own, and you can’t always help either. When reading scripts that rely on reading in order and moving through a lot of lines quickly, internet lags can make a 5-minute script take 15 minutes.
  • Figure out, or prepare for, microphone issues ahead of time. I’ve seen some teachers may require kids to keep their microphones on during a virtual class. I didn’t want to require that, but I debated requiring kids to keep them on during a play they were performing in to help keep things moving. I decided not to, for privacy, and that ended up being the best decision. It slowed things down, but one of our particular participants who muted between every line had a screaming baby in the background. It added a few minutes to things, but it was more enjoyable for everyone.

Program Resources

Access our program resources at the links below!

Baby & Toddler Programs (Ages 0-3)

Baby Prom
Baby Storytimes
Play & Learn
Play & Learn At Home (virtual)
Science Baby
Toddler Storytimes


Preschool Programs (Ages 3-5)

1000 Books Before Kindergarten Part 1
1000 Books Before Kindergarten Part 2

Preschool Storytimes
Noon Year’s Eve (virtual)
Stuffed Animal Sleepover
Winnie the Pooh Party

Kits (pick-up or mail-to-you)
Little Free Library Kits (picture frame craft) (no contact)
Little Free Library Kits: Dragonfly Craft (no contact)

Passive Programs
Imagination Station: Mission Control
Imagination Station: Movie Theater

Themed Storytimes
Animals in Winter (STEAM storytime)
Baby Shark Storytime
Baby Shark Storytime (virtual)
Daniel Tiger Storytime (virtual)
Doc McStuffins Storytime (virtual)
Don’t Let Pigeon Take Over Storytime! (virtual)
Elephant & Piggie Storytime (virtual)
Fancy Nancy Storytime (virtual)
Llama Llama Red Pajama Storytime (virtual)
Molly of Denali Storytime (virtual)
Mother Bruce Storytime
Paw Patrol Rescue Academy (virtual)
Pete the Cat Storytime (virtual)
Pinkalicious Storytime (virtual)


School Age Programs (Ages 6-11)

BINGO
Book Character BINGO (virtual)
Dog Man BINGO (virtual)
Superhero BINGO (virtual)

Book Programs
Book Talk: Virtual (Gr. K-5) (virtual)
Book Talks (virtual)
Book Talks & Displays – OverDrive and YouTube (virtual)
Graphic Novel Book Club (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Ella Fitzgerald (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Harriet Tubman (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Jean-Michel Basquiat (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Malala Yousafzai (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Martin Luther King Jr. (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Muhammad Ali (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Rosa Parks (virtual)
Reader’s Theater
Reader’s Theater (virtual)
Service: Subscription Bundles (no contact)

Craft Programs
Dragon Egg Craft
Make & Take Crafternoon

Kits (pick-up or mail-to-you)
Baby-Sitters Club Membership Kits (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Azaleah Lane (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Elephant & Piggie (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Mindy Kim (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Narwhal & Jelly (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: New Kid (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Pete the Cat (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Phoebe and Her Unicorn (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Shuri (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Wings of Fire (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Yasmin (no contact)
Book Club in a Bag: Zoey and Sassafras (coming soon)
Camp Half Blood Welcome Kits (no contact)
How to Train Your Dragon Kits (no contact)
Who Would Win? Animal Matchups (no contact)

Party Programs (celebrate popular books or characters)
Dog Man to the Rescue
Frozen Sing Along & Celebration
Pokémon Party
Pokémon Week (Trivia, Guess that Pokemon, BINGO) (virtual)

Passive Programs
Book Tournament
I Spy
Scavenger Hunts

Tech Programs
Innovation Academy: Coding (virtual)
Innovation Academy: Coding 101
Innovation Academy: Tech Fair
Innovation Academy: Virtual and Augmented Reality (virtual)

Trivia
Disney Trivia (virtual)
Dog Man Trivia (virtual)
Weird But True Trivia (virtual)


Teen Programs (Ages 12-18)

Happy Little Painting (Bob Ross)
Programming Fails: The Best Laid Plans
Steven Universe Color Party
String Art: Programming By a Thread
Teen Advisory Board
Teen Craft Kit: Bubble Tea (no contact)
Teen Volunteer Training

Passive Programs
Teen Passive Program: Coloring
Teen Passive Program: Concentrate on Charms


Readers’ Advisory

Virtual Book Displays (Genially)
Virtual Book Talks (audio)
Virtual Reader’s Advisory Part I (videos)
Virtual Reader’s Advisory Part II (Overdrive and videos) (coming soon)
Virtual Video Book Talks


Summer Reading

Summer Reading Promo Video


Day in the Life

Day in the Life: A Monday in the Library (post-pandemic)
Day in the Life: A Tuesday Work From Home (post-pandemic) (coming soon)

Virtual Book Talks

Reader’s Advisory and book talks are a major part of any youth librarian’s job–you need to be familiar with popular titles as well as be ready for those more obscure reader’s advisory questions (“I want books about REAL unicorns. None of that pink glittery nonsense. The REAL ones that eat people.”).

In the library, we provide this service regularly through all kinds of resources–in-person reader’s advisory, displays, booklists, librarian-curated posters and bookmarks of recommended titles and popular genres, and more. My library also sends us into classrooms to talk directly to kids about some great books they might be interested in.

I read a lot. I also love booktalking in classrooms. But I am now working from home, schools in Ohio are not going back this year, and, honestly, I don’t really expect public librarians (or anyone really) to be allowed into classrooms next fall.

So how do we keep reaching those kids? The same ways we have been doing everything lately…virtually.

Learn about how my virtual reader’s advisory evolved into video book talks – plus plenty of examples – in this post.

Video Book Talks

Someday, when we are in a better routine and know what to expect out of life again, I would love to make video book talks. At the moment, I am just getting my feet under me with weekly virtual storytimes and starting monthly virtual school-age programs, and with the constant uncertainty of when and how we will reopen, I don’t want to start something like this at the moment.

Feel free to watch this, uh, interesting creation circa 2017 (that has over 700 views?!?!?!).

I think there are ways to make virtual video book talks much more engaging than the above video, even after eliminating the obvious issues like what-color-is-that-wall and better sound (And, um, pronouncing the title and main character’s name correctly. I’m sorry Hena Khan.).

Some of my dream video book talks include a lot more engaging cuts, edits, and images to be more visually exciting, but I think I may have to settle for a notch under that if I am able to start filming these in the next few months, just due to the time required to make those edits. I’m storyboarding our summer reading video at the moment, and while I think it is going to be pretty awesome, I also recognize the time involved.

Audio Book Talks

One of my coworkers started making audio-only book talks uploaded to SoundCloud, which is a new format for me. I really miss the visual element of video, but I will be the first to admit that it is much easier to read a script into a microphone than babble into a camera and worry about lighting and camera placement and my hands endlessly moving.

I have not put in the time on these that my coworker has (listen to Lisa’s great work here), but some of my files are linked below.

For any of you with an ear for audiobooks–I know some of you are reading this blog–please ignore my mouth sounds. And breathing. And spit. And dry mouth. And p-pops. I’ve been trying to edit all of that out, but it is exhausting, and there is only so much time in the work day. I can’t spend three hours or more editing a three-minute audio file, as much as ALL I HEAR is spit when these play.

Note: I watched a webinar yesterday on disability access and virtual programming. One of the key points they mentioned was making audio files accessible with a script to read for folks who are deaf. I hadn’t considered that before but am planning to edit descriptions for the files below and include text for future audio book talks.

2nd-3rd Grade:

Desmond Cole Ghost Patrol by Andres Miedoso

Mia Mayhem by Kara West

Zoey & Sassafras by Asia Citro

3rd-4th Grade:

Poop Detectives by Ginger Wadsworth (non-fiction)

Klawde: Evil Alien Warlord Cat by Johnny Marciano

4th-5th Grade:

Small Spaces by Katherine Arden

Do you have plans for new ways to look at reader’s advisory in a world where we may not be encouraging patrons to hang out in our building and may not be going into new locations for in-person outreach?

Storytime Resources

Access our storytime resources at the links below!

Storytime Resources

Baby Bounce Rhymes
Book Retellings (using flannels, magnets, puppets, props and more!)
Diversify Your Storytime Music (songs by artists from underrepresented populations)
Fingerplay Favorites
Flannel and Magnet Activities
Movement Rhymes
Storytime with Large Crowds
Why I Don’t Use Themes

Storytime Book Recommendations

2020 Favorite Storytime Books

Flannel Board Fun

Buzz Said the Bee
Five Little Snails
Five Little Tacos
Five Little Unicorns
Little Mouse, Little Mouse (focus on inclusivity)
Make a Pig
Oh Dear
Wiggleworm, Wiggleworm

Themed Storytimes

Animals in Winter (STEAM storytime)
Baby Shark Storytime (virtual)
Daniel Tiger Storytime (virtual)
Doc McStuffins Storytime (virtual)
Don’t Let the Pigeon Take Over Storytime! (Mo Willems Pigeon) (virtual)
Elephant & Piggie Storytime (virtual)
Fancy Nancy Storytime (virtual)
Llama Llama Red Pajama Storytime (virtual)
Molly of Denali Storytime (virtual)
Mother Bruce Storytime
Noon Year’s Eve Storytime (virtual)
Paw Patrol Rescue Academy (virtual)
Pete the Cat Storytime (virtual)
Pinkalicious Storytime (virtual)
Stuffed Animal Sleepover (includes a drop-off storytime)

Baby Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytimes (designed for ages 0-2) are not themed. The below list highlights the book shared that week.

Baby Storytime: Toes, Ears, & Nose!
Baby Storytime Week 1: Babies on the Bus (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 2: Row, Row, Row Your Boat (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 3: Jump! (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 4: Up! (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 5: If You’re Happy and You Know It (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 6: Baby Goes Beep (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 7: Peek-a-Baby (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 8: Everybunny Count (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 9: Leo Loves Baby Time (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 10: Head and Shoulders (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 11: Wheels on the Bus (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 12: Kiss, Tickle, Cuddle Hug (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 13: Look! Babies Head to Toe (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 14: The Babies and Kitties Book (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 15: Whose Nose and Toes? (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 16: Baby Loves Fall (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 17: What Is Baby Going to Do? (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 18: Baby Goes Beep (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 19: Welcome to the Party (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 20: I Love You Baby Burrito (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 21: Twinkle Twinkle Diaper You (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 22: Leo Loves Daddy (virtual)

Toddler Storytime Outlines

Toddler Storytimes (designed for ages 2-3) are not themed. The below list highlights the books shared that week.

Toddler Storytime Week 1: Shark in the Park (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 2: There’s a Monster in Your Book & Bark George (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 3: Spunky Little Monkey (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 4: Crunch the Shy Dinosaur & White Rabbit’s Color Book (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 5: Farmyard Beat & Dear Zoo (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 6: Is Everyone Ready for Fun? & Go Away Big Green Monster (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 7: Dancing Feet & Tip Tip Dig Dig (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 8: Tap the Magic Tree (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 9: Five Little Monsters & I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 10: The Ghosts Went Floating & The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 11: Don’t Wake Up the Tiger & Move Over Rover (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 12: Is That Wise Pig? & One Red Sock (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 13: I Love Me! & Where Spot? (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 14: I Love My Tutu Too! & The Bridge Is Up (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 15: Baby Goes to Market & The Enormous Turnip (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 16: The Doghouse & Polar Bear Polar Bear (virtual)

Preschool Storytime Outlines

Preschool Storytimes (designed for ages 3-5) are not themed. The below list includes the books shared that week.

Preschool Storytime Week 1: Cow Loves Cookies & Dog’s Colorful Day (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 2: Grandma’s Tiny House & The Very Hungry Caterpillar (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 3: Swallow the Leader & Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 4: I Got the Rhythm & Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 5: What the Dinosaurs Did Last Night & Tickle Monster (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 6: Bedtime Bonnet & If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 7: Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao & Froggy Gets Dressed (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 8: King of Kindergarten & Goodnight Moon (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 9: Every Little Letter & There’s a Superhero in Your Book (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 10: Don’t Feed the Coos & Polar Bear’s Underwear (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 11: Mother Bruce & Little Blue Truck (virtual)

School Age Storytime Outlines

Little People, Big Dreams: Ella Fitzgerald (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Harriet Tubman (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Jean-Michel Basquiat (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Malala Yousafzai (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Martin Luther King, Jr. (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Muhammad Ali (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Rosa Parks (virtual)

Other

2021 Storytime Goals

Little People Big Dreams Storytime: Malala Yousafzai

As part of our virtual programming, I run a monthly school age storytime, designed for ages 6-8. This program highlights a different individual from the Little People Big Dreams book series. In April, this program featured Malala Yousafzai.

Each program features 1-2 books on the famous individual (one book being their matching title from the Little People, Big Dreams book series). I also highlight music from Black artists and include a link to an at-home packet to continue the fun and learning.

Note: I did not present this program–my fantastic coworker presented this for me since I was out sick. I’m still happy to share these resources with all of you!

Explore More Little People, Big Dreams Storytime Outlines:

Ella Fitzgerald
Harriet Tubman
Jean Michel Basquiat
Martin Luther King Jr.
Muhammad Ali
Rosa Parks

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

In the event description, I included the link to the printable at home activity packet.

Storytime Outline

Intro: Teddy Bear by Jazzy Ash

First Book: Malala Yousafzai by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara (Little People Big Dreams)

Malala Yousafzai (Little People, Big Dreams) - Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara,  illustrated by Manal Mirza - 9780711259027 - Murdoch books

Movement Break: Super Shaker Song by Culture Queen

Second Book: Malala’s Magic Pencil by Malala Yousafzai

Malala's Magic Pencil: Yousafzai, Malala, Kerascoët: 9780316319577:  Amazon.com: Books

Closing Rhyme: See You Later, Alligator

See you later, alligator
In a while, crocodile
Give a hug, ladybug
Blow a kiss, jellyfish
See you soon, big baboon
Out the door, dinosaur
Take care, polar bear
Wave goodbye, butterfly!

Next Time: Maya Angelou

Little People Big Dreams Storytime: Jean-Michel Basquiat

As part of our virtual programming, I run a monthly school age storytime, designed for ages 6-8. This program highlights a different diverse individual from the Little People Big Dreams book series. In March, this program featured Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Each program features 1-2 books on the famous individual (one book being their matching title from the Little People, Big Dreams book series). I also highlight music from a diverse artist and include a link to an at-home packet to continue the fun and learning.

Explore More Little People, Big Dreams Storytime Outlines:

Ella Fitzgerald
Harriet Tubman
Malala Yousafzai
Martin Luther King Jr.
Muhammad Ali
Rosa Parks

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Watch the full storytime here:

In the event description, I included the link to the printable at home activity packet.

Storytime Outline

Intro: Teddy Bear by Jazzy Ash

First Book: Jean-Michel Basquiat by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara (Little People Big Dreams)

LITTLE PEOPLE BIG DREAMS JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT /ANGLAIS: SANCHEZ VEGARA  ISABE: 9780711245792: Amazon.com: Books

Movement Break: Down Down Up Up by Kymberly Stewart

Second Book: Radiant Child by Javaka Steptoe

Children's Books - Mobile Museum of Art - Mobile Museum of Art

Closing Rhyme: See You Later, Alligator

See you later, alligator
In a while, crocodile
Give a hug, ladybug
Blow a kiss, jellyfish
See you soon, big baboon
Out the door, dinosaur
Take care, polar bear
Wave goodbye, butterfly!

Next Time: Malala Yousafzai

Little People Big Dreams Storytime: Muhammad Ali

As part of our virtual programming, I run a monthly school age storytime, designed for ages 6-8. This program highlights a different diverse individual from the Little People Big Dreams book series. In February, this program featured Muhammad Ali.

Each program features 1-2 books on the famous individual (one book being their matching title from the Little People, Big Dreams book series). I also highlight music from a diverse artist and include a link to an at-home packet to continue the fun and learning.

Explore More Little People, Big Dreams Storytime Outlines:

Ella Fitzgerald
Harriet Tubman
Jean Michel Basquiat
Malala Yousafzai
Martin Luther King Jr.
Rosa Parks

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Watch the full storytime here.

In the event description, I included the link to the printable at home activity packet.

Storytime Outline

Intro: Teddy Bear by Jazzy Ash

First Book: Muhammad Ali by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara (Little People Big Dreams)

Image result for little people big dreams muhammad ali

Movement Break: Banana Banana Meatball by Blazer Fresh (GoNoodle)

Second Book: Muhammad Ali: A Champion Is Born by Gene Baretta

Image result for muhammad ali book picture

Closing Rhyme: See You Later, Alligator

See you later, alligator
In a while, crocodile
Give a hug, ladybug
Blow a kiss, jellyfish
See you soon, big baboon
Out the door, dinosaur
Take care, polar bear
Wave goodbye, butterfly!

Next Time: Jean-Michel Basquiat

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:)