Search Results for "virtual school"

Little People Big Dreams Storytime: Rosa Parks

As part of our virtual programming, I run a monthly school age storytime, designed for ages 6-8. This program highlights a different diverse individual from the Little People Big Dreams book series. In November, I featured Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycotts in my Little People Big Dreams Storytime.

Each program features 1-2 books on the famous individual (one book being their matching title from the Little People, Big Dreams book series). I also highlight music from a diverse artist and include a link to an at-home packet to continue the fun and learning.

Explore More Little People, Big Dreams Storytime Outlines:

Ella Fitzgerald
Harriet Tubman
Jean Michel Basquiat
Malala Yousafzai
Martin Luther King Jr.
Muhammad Ali

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Watch the full storytime here:

In the event description, I included the link to the printable at-home activity packet.

Storytime Outline

Intro: Teddy Bear by Jazzy Ash

First Book: Rosa Parks by Lisbeth Kaiser (Little People Big Dreams)

Rosa Parks (Little People, Big Dreams): 9781786030177: Amazon.com: Books

Music Break: Leap Frog by Jazzy Ash (with shakers)

Second Book: Pies from Nowhere: How Georgia Gilmore Sustained the Montgomery Bus Boycott by Dee Romitto

Pies from Nowhere: How Georgia Gilmore Sustained the Montgomery Bus Boycott:  Romito, Dee, Freeman, Laura: 9781499807202: Amazon.com: Books

Closing Rhyme: See You Later, Alligator

See you later, alligator
In a while, crocodile
Give a hug, ladybug
Blow a kiss, jellyfish
See you soon, big baboon
Out the door, dinosaur
Take care, polar bear
Wave goodbye, butterfly!

Next Time: Harriet Tubman

Little People Big Dreams: Ella Fitzgerald

As part of our virtual programming, I began a monthly school age storytime, designed for ages 6-8. This program highlights a different diverse individual from the Little People Big Dreams book series.

Explore More Little People, Big Dreams Storytime Outlines:

Harriet Tubman
Jean Michel Basquiat
Malala Yousafzai
Martin Luther King Jr.
Muhammad Ali
Rosa Parks

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Like all of our virtual live storytimes, this program took place on Facebook. I didn’t expect an audience here, and, as I expected, I was very much presenting a storytime to no one, but we are leaving these programs up a little longer than regular storytimes due to the content. We have had a slight increase in views over time, and I’m thinking about ways to make this more accessible (such as uploading storytimes to YouTube).

Watch the full storytime here:

In the event description, I included links to:

Storytime Outline

Intro: Teddy Bear by Jazzy Ash

First Book: Ella Fitzgerald by Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara (Little People Big Dreams)

Ella Fitzgerald: 11 (Little People, Big Dreams): Amazon.co.uk: Sanchez  Vegara, Isabel, Alca, Bàrbara: Books

Music Break: A Tisket, A Tasket by Ella Fitzgerald (with shakers)

Second Book: Making Their Voices Heard : The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and Marilyn Monroe

Making Their Voices Heard: The Inspiring Friendship of Ella Fitzgerald and  Marilyn Monroe: Kirkfield, Vivian, Harris, Alleanna: 9781499809152:  Amazon.com: Books

Closing Rhyme: See You Later, Alligator

See you later, alligator
In a while, crocodile
Give a hug, ladybug
Blow a kiss, jellyfish
See you soon, big baboon
Out the door, dinosaur
Take care, polar bear
Wave goodbye, butterfly!

Next Time

In October, I’m planning to focus on athlete Pele. I think the storytime outline is going to stay the same, though not all famous people are going to lend themselves to a specific song like Ella Fitzgerald does. I’d like to continue to always use diverse musicians for my music though, no matter who that month’s famous individual is. I’m hoping interest in this series grows over time.

Virtual Book Talks

Reader’s Advisory and book talks are a major part of any youth librarian’s job–you need to be familiar with popular titles as well as be ready for those more obscure reader’s advisory questions (“I want books about REAL unicorns. None of that pink glittery nonsense. The REAL ones that eat people.”).

In the library, we provide this service regularly through all kinds of resources–in-person reader’s advisory, displays, booklists, librarian-curated posters and bookmarks of recommended titles and popular genres, and more. My library also sends us into classrooms to talk directly to kids about some great books they might be interested in.

I read a lot. I also love booktalking in classrooms. But I am now working from home, schools in Ohio are not going back this year, and, honestly, I don’t really expect public librarians (or anyone really) to be allowed into classrooms next fall.

So how do we keep reaching those kids? The same ways we have been doing everything lately…virtually.

Learn about how my virtual reader’s advisory evolved into video book talks – plus plenty of examples – in this post.

Video Book Talks

Someday, when we are in a better routine and know what to expect out of life again, I would love to make video book talks. At the moment, I am just getting my feet under me with weekly virtual storytimes and starting monthly virtual school-age programs, and with the constant uncertainty of when and how we will reopen, I don’t want to start something like this at the moment.

Feel free to watch this, uh, interesting creation circa 2017 (that has over 700 views?!?!?!).

I think there are ways to make virtual video book talks much more engaging than the above video, even after eliminating the obvious issues like what-color-is-that-wall and better sound (And, um, pronouncing the title and main character’s name correctly. I’m sorry Hena Khan.).

Some of my dream video book talks include a lot more engaging cuts, edits, and images to be more visually exciting, but I think I may have to settle for a notch under that if I am able to start filming these in the next few months, just due to the time required to make those edits. I’m storyboarding our summer reading video at the moment, and while I think it is going to be pretty awesome, I also recognize the time involved.

Audio Book Talks

One of my coworkers started making audio-only book talks uploaded to SoundCloud, which is a new format for me. I really miss the visual element of video, but I will be the first to admit that it is much easier to read a script into a microphone than babble into a camera and worry about lighting and camera placement and my hands endlessly moving.

I have not put in the time on these that my coworker has (listen to Lisa’s great work here), but some of my files are linked below.

For any of you with an ear for audiobooks–I know some of you are reading this blog–please ignore my mouth sounds. And breathing. And spit. And dry mouth. And p-pops. I’ve been trying to edit all of that out, but it is exhausting, and there is only so much time in the work day. I can’t spend three hours or more editing a three-minute audio file, as much as ALL I HEAR is spit when these play.

Note: I watched a webinar yesterday on disability access and virtual programming. One of the key points they mentioned was making audio files accessible with a script to read for folks who are deaf. I hadn’t considered that before but am planning to edit descriptions for the files below and include text for future audio book talks.

2nd-3rd Grade:

Desmond Cole Ghost Patrol by Andres Miedoso

Mia Mayhem by Kara West

Zoey & Sassafras by Asia Citro

3rd-4th Grade:

Poop Detectives by Ginger Wadsworth (non-fiction)

Klawde: Evil Alien Warlord Cat by Johnny Marciano

4th-5th Grade:

Small Spaces by Katherine Arden

Do you have plans for new ways to look at reader’s advisory in a world where we may not be encouraging patrons to hang out in our building and may not be going into new locations for in-person outreach?

Storytime Resources

Access our storytime resources at the links below!

Storytime Resources

Baby Bounce Rhymes
Book Retellings (using flannels, magnets, puppets, props and more!)
Diversify Your Storytime Music (songs by artists from underrepresented populations)
Fingerplay Favorites
Flannel and Magnet Activities
Movement Rhymes
Storytime with Large Crowds
Why I Don’t Use Themes

Storytime Book Recommendations

2020 Favorite Storytime Books
Storytime Spotlight (June 2021)

Flannel Board Fun

Buzz Said the Bee
Five Little Snails
Five Little Tacos
Five Little Unicorns
Little Mouse, Little Mouse (focus on inclusivity)
Make a Pig
Oh Dear
Wiggleworm, Wiggleworm

Themed Storytimes

Animals in Winter (STEAM storytime)
Baby Shark Storytime (virtual)
Daniel Tiger Storytime (virtual)
Doc McStuffins Storytime (virtual)
Don’t Let the Pigeon Take Over Storytime! (Mo Willems Pigeon) (virtual)
Elephant & Piggie Storytime (virtual)
Fancy Nancy Storytime (virtual)
Llama Llama Red Pajama Storytime (virtual)
Molly of Denali Storytime (virtual)
Mother Bruce Storytime
Noon Year’s Eve Storytime (virtual)
Paw Patrol Rescue Academy (virtual)
Pete the Cat Storytime (virtual)
Pinkalicious Storytime (virtual)
Stuffed Animal Sleepover (includes a drop-off storytime)

Baby Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytimes (designed for ages 0-2) are not themed. The below list highlights the book shared that week.

Baby Storytime: Toes, Ears, & Nose!
Baby Storytime Week 1: Babies on the Bus (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 2: Row, Row, Row Your Boat (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 3: Jump! (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 4: Up! (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 5: If You’re Happy and You Know It (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 6: Baby Goes Beep (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 7: Peek-a-Baby (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 8: Everybunny Count (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 9: Leo Loves Baby Time (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 10: Head and Shoulders (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 11: Wheels on the Bus (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 12: Kiss, Tickle, Cuddle Hug (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 13: Look! Babies Head to Toe (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 14: The Babies and Kitties Book (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 15: Whose Nose and Toes? (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 16: Baby Loves Fall (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 17: What Is Baby Going to Do? (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 18: Baby Goes Beep (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 19: Welcome to the Party (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 20: I Love You Baby Burrito (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 21: Twinkle Twinkle Diaper You (virtual)
Baby Storytime Week 22: Leo Loves Daddy (virtual)

Toddler Storytime Outlines

Toddler Storytimes (designed for ages 2-3) are not themed. The below list highlights the books shared that week.

Toddler Storytime Week 1: Shark in the Park (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 2: There’s a Monster in Your Book & Bark George (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 3: Spunky Little Monkey (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 4: Crunch the Shy Dinosaur & White Rabbit’s Color Book (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 5: Farmyard Beat & Dear Zoo (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 6: Is Everyone Ready for Fun? & Go Away Big Green Monster (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 7: Dancing Feet & Tip Tip Dig Dig (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 8: Tap the Magic Tree (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 9: Five Little Monsters & I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 10: The Ghosts Went Floating & The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 11: Don’t Wake Up the Tiger & Move Over Rover (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 12: Is That Wise Pig? & One Red Sock (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 13: I Love Me! & Where Spot? (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 14: I Love My Tutu Too! & The Bridge Is Up (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 15: Baby Goes to Market & The Enormous Turnip (virtual)
Toddler Storytime Week 16: The Doghouse & Polar Bear Polar Bear (virtual)

Preschool Storytime Outlines

Preschool Storytimes (designed for ages 3-5) are not themed. The below list includes the books shared that week.

Preschool Storytime Week 1: Cow Loves Cookies & Dog’s Colorful Day (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 2: Grandma’s Tiny House & The Very Hungry Caterpillar (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 3: Swallow the Leader & Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 4: I Got the Rhythm & Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 5: What the Dinosaurs Did Last Night & Tickle Monster (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 6: Bedtime Bonnet & If You Give a Mouse a Cookie (virtual)
Preschool Storytime Week 7: Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao & Froggy Gets Dressed (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 8: King of Kindergarten & Goodnight Moon (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 9: Every Little Letter & There’s a Superhero in Your Book (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 10: Don’t Feed the Coos & Polar Bear’s Underwear (virtual)
Preschool Storytime: Week 11: Mother Bruce & Little Blue Truck (virtual)

School Age Storytime Outlines

Little People, Big Dreams: Ella Fitzgerald (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Harriet Tubman (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Jean-Michel Basquiat (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Malala Yousafzai (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Martin Luther King, Jr. (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Muhammad Ali (virtual)
Little People, Big Dreams: Rosa Parks (virtual)

Other

2021 Storytime Goals

Virtual Innovation Academy: Coding

I’ve been part of my library’s virtual storytime team over the last month, and today, it is my turn to expand into virtual school age programming, with an online adaptation of my Innovation Academy programs.

About three years ago, I started the Innovation Academy programming series because of a technology grant that gave us about $5000 in tech ideal for ages 8-11. The program series was popular, as anything with technology seems to be, but after a few years I grew close to burnout with tech. I was one of the only staff members interested in tech programming, and I felt obligated to keep creating it since there was a patron interest.

We had a mixed audience at each Innovation Academy program, which made it difficult to plan. I couldn’t move on to advanced content because at least a third of every program’s attendees would have never used any kind of tech before. Another third would have come to every single tech program I had done in the last 2-3 years, and they would quite loudly complain that they had done this activity before. The other third would be some combination of the previous two, while also regularly letting me know that they had more advanced tech at home or at school. Oh, and there were also the kids who were too young to be in the room and couldn’t read (and didn’t have the patience to try to work through any kind of problem solving).

Luckily, last year, our department divided up the Innovation Academy program series, expanding its content to cover more than tech but also expanding the staff who ran the program. This gave me a much-needed technology break, and while I can’t say I am ready to jump back into monthly tech programs, I don’t mind the occasional offering, and I definitely don’t mind trying to translate that content to a new medium–online!

My library decided to approach school age programming so that:

  • Ages are expanded–all programs have materials for ages 6-11.
  • Attendees register via Evanced (our regular event registration software).
  • On the day of the event, the program presenter will email attendees a video introduction as well as a PDF with resources, content, and activities to do at home.

My first Innovation Academy program goes live today, so I don’t know what the patron feedback will be. Four days before the event, we already have 60 sign-ups, which is fantastic! Our first school-age event from last week, virtual Young Engineers, received a great response from virtual attendees, so I’m hoping that pattern continues.

Innovation Academy Content

This session’s intro video is below. It is boring. I’m going to work on ways to make it more engaging–including seeing my face talking–for next time, but I was determined to get this done this week, and double storytimes meant that reading my notes instead of talking was just easier.

Participants can watch the video, or they can move straight to the packet, included below. It covers the vocabulary reviewed in the video, and also provides four pages of coding resources for all levels of coders, from beginning to advanced, including unplugged, block-based, and text-based coding activities.

Pros and Cons

Obviously this format is different than standard library programming, and there isn’t too much we can do about that. Until we have a vaccine for COVID-19, our world is going to look different. Encouraging people to gather for entertainment purposes, while mentally helpful, is simply dangerous at the moment. Speaking personally, my life, my coworker’s lives, and our patron’s lives aren’t worth creating an hour’s worth of entertainment–or learning–right now. When stay at home orders are lifted, some people will run from their homes to any open location–that doesn’t mean we are obligated to amuse them at our own personal risk. Other people will stay home and prioritize their and other people’s safety.

Everyone will make their own choices, and virtual programming allows us to reach people in a way that is safe for everyone. Unfortunately, it means we will be missing people, especially those that need our services the most. I don’t have an answer for that, but I will say that in almost all cases, in my particular library, the people who are coming into our library to attend our physical programs are not the people who don’t have Internet at home. They may make choices about screen time limits that may make it hard to attend our virtual programs–and honestly, if you are able to stick to those limits in these crazy times, good for you–but they still have access if they choose to use it.

I don’t think temporarily moving our programs virtual is preventing our regular users from accessing the library. Figuring out how to reach those folks who could never make it into the library in the first place is a bigger question, and virtual programming may actually be opening doors instead of closing them. According to Pew Research, 68% of low income families use social media (with Facebook being by far the most popular tool). While I don’t have the statistics, I will bet that 68% of our low income families don’t visit our library regularly.

Obviously, no matter how I try to spin it, there are still cons to online programs. They feel impersonal. I can’t adjust a program based on a participant’s response. I can’t lead them through a problem the same way I could in person. I can’t give them physical items to work with and explore, from robots and 3D printing pens to even simple craft materials. I don’t even know how many participants opened the files I sent or actually did any activity. People could really struggle with what I provide, or simply not like the format, and I may never know.

To end on a positive note, however, there are small good things to focus on too. So many of those reasons that I was burnt out on tech disappear here. I can provide activities and resources for all ages and abilities–from those preschoolers sneaking their way into school-age programs to the attendees that have been coding for years. I’ve got you all covered.

Online programs can promote family engagement in a way that in-library programs can promote peer-to-peer learning. Adults learn about fun ways they can connect with their kids without having to spend money on robots and 3D printing pens and craft supplies. Programs can be completed whenever is convenient for a family–as soon as an email is distributed, after work is done, over the weekend, a year from now. If the baby is super grumpy, a family doesn’t have to worry about leaving the house and arriving 30 minutes late. If a kid is really, really, really bored with Scratch, they don’t have to yell that at the top of their lungs in a room of their peers–they can just try Code Combat instead.

I want to get these kids back in our programming space–I miss them. I miss watching them grow up over the last few months, and possibly over the next year. Virtual programming provides us a bit of everything–while we don’t always get to see the kids, we still get to connect with families, share some cool learning opportunities, and connect our patrons to the ideas, interests, and passions that matter to them. Just with a little more distance between us and them.

Virtual Baby Storytime: Week 22

Bye again babies! I’m back to toddlers next week, and I am pulling out some of my favorite content in April. We aren’t sure what summer storytimes will bring yet–fewer virtual storytimes? Outdoor storytimes? No more mask requirements from the state? My question of the week: can you require social distancing in a program if your library no longer requires it overall? Or does social distancing in a program just turn into a suggestion that is encouraged by limiting attendance? What is your library doing as you consider returning to in-person programs and events?

More Baby Storytime Content:

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytime Intro Song & Rhyme – Wake Up Toes & We Clap and Sing Hello

Early Literacy Tip: Check out our new 1000 Books Before Kindergarten program!

Book Recommendation: Leo Loves Daddy by Anna McQuinn

Leo Loves Daddy: McQuinn, Anna, Hearson, Ruth: 9781623542412: Amazon.com:  Books

Song: Clap Your Hands by Old Town School of Folk Music

Action Rhyme: These Little Fingers

These little fingers go
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle,
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle,
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle
These little fingers go
Wiggle, wiggle, wiggle
And now they’re on my…HEAD!

Continue with: tummy, feet

Bounce: A Bouncing We Will Go

A bouncing we will go,
A bouncing we will go,
Hi ho the derry o,
A bouncing we will go.

Continue with: rocking, tickling

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Bounce/Movement: Rocking Horse

Rocking horse, rocking horse, to and fro,
Side to side and away we go,
Rocking horse, rocking horse, front and back,
Don’t fall off just like that.

Woah!

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Song: Tickle Time by Moey’s Music Party

Puppets/Animal Sounds: Do Crocs Kiss? by Salina Yoon

— Find more Book Retellings in this post. —

Manipulative: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes by Super Simple Songs

Closing Song: If You’re Happy and You Know It by Old Town School of Folk Music

Virtual Baby Storytime: Week 21

Babies, babies, babies! Continuing the storytime routine with lots of repeated favorites this week (but a new book!). I just wrapped up Brooke Newbery‘s Babies in the Library UW-Madison course, giving me some new ideas to help refresh programming for this age (and so many great play ideas…for whenever play can return!). Everything around programming is a question right now, but I’m looking forward to thinking about ways to increase services for babies in the next few years.

More Baby Storytime Content:

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytime Intro Song & Rhyme – Wake Up Toes & We Clap and Sing Hello

Early Literacy Tip: Sing during everyday activities, like changing a diaper. Singing slows down words.

Book Recommendation: Twinkle, Twinkle, Diaper You! by Ellen Mayer

Song: Row, Row, Row Your Boat by Old Town School of Folk Music

Action Rhyme: Do you Like? (adapted for babies)

Do you like to bounce around?
Bounce around, bounce around?
Do you like to bounce around?
Bounce, and now let’s FREEZE!

Bounce: Giddy Up

Giddy up, giddy up, ride to town.
Giddy up, giddy up, UP and DOWN.
Giddy up fast!
Giddy up slow.
Giddy up, giddy up, giddy up, WHOA! (lift)

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Bounce/Movement: I’m Toast in the Toaster

I’m toast in the toaster,
I’m getting very hot!
Tick tock, tick tock,
Up I pop!

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Song: The Tickle Song by Rainbow Songs

Puppets/Animal Sounds: Jump by Scott M. Fischer

— Find more Book Retellings in this post. —

Manipulative: Shakey Shaky by the Wiggles (Shakers)

Closing Song: If You’re Happy and You Know It by Old Town School of Folk Music

Virtual Baby Storytime: Week 19

More babies! I’m close to a full year of virtual storytimes now–not quite there yet, but more on that soon. There are more than 50 virtual storytime outlines on this blog already! We are now officially one year since my last in-person baby storytime. (And playtime! I miss playtime.) I’m proud of the virtual work I’ve done over the last year, but I am starting to get itchy for some kind of change. I don’t necessarily know if I want things to be what they were, entirely, but I want…something? Hmmmm. Not entirely sure, but for now, more baby content.

More Baby Storytime Content:

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytime Intro Song & Rhyme – Wake Up Toes & We Clap and Sing Hello

Early Literacy Tip: Grasping objects helps build finger muscles that help with writing.

Book Recommendation: Welcome to the Party by Gabrielle Union

Welcome to the Party: Union, Gabrielle, Evans, Ashley: 9780062978615:  Amazon.com: Books

Song: What Shall We Do with the Sleeping Baby by Rainbow Songs

Action Rhyme: Zoom Down the Freeway

Zoom down the freeway,
Zoom down the freeway,
Zoom down the freeway,
FAST!

Continue with:
Up goes the drawbridge…a ship is going past.
Down goes the drawbridge…ship has passed at last.
Zoom down the freeway!

Bounce: A Hippopotamus on a City Bus

A hip, a hip, a hippopotamus
Got on, got on, got on a city bus
And all, and all, and all the people said,
“You’re squishing us!” (hug)

A cow, a cow
A cow got on the bus
And all, and all, and all the people said,
“Mooooove over!“ (tilt sideways

A sheep, a sheep,
A sheep got on the bus
And all, and all, and all the people said,
“Baaaack up!“ (lean back)

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Bounce/Movement: Humpty Dumpty

Rock and rock and rock on the wall
Rock and rock; I hope we don’t fall!

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall (tilt backwards or sideways)

All the kings horses and all the kings men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again!

— Find more Baby Bounces in this post. —

Song: Hands Together, Hands Apart by Rainbow Songs

Puppets/Animal Sounds: Dear Zoo

Manipulative: Stuffed Animals & Little Red Wagon by Old Town School of Folk Music

Closing Song: If You’re Happy and You Know It by Old Town School of Folk Music

Virtual Baby Storytime: Week 15

More Baby Storytime fun in November! I am particularly happy with adapting Jane Cabrera’s Row Row Row Your Boat into an animal sounds puppet activity. I’ve been waiting to adapt that one for a while!

More Baby Storytime Content:

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Baby Storytime Intro Song & Rhyme

Early Literacy Tip: Hearing and making animal sounds helps your child hear different kinds of sounds in language.

Book: Whose Nose and Toes? by John Butler

Song: Clap Your Hands by Old Town School of Folk Music

Action Rhyme: Clap, Clap, Clap Your Hands

Bounce Rhyme: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 I Caught a Fish Alive

Find more Baby Bounce Rhymes. —

Bounce: Here We Go Up, Up, Up

Find more Baby Bounce Rhymes. —

Song: Put Your Baby in the Air by Caspar Babypants

Puppets: Row, Row, Row Your Boat by Jane Cabrera

Find more Book Retelling activities. —

Manipulative: Got the Wiggles by Bobs and Lolo

Closing Song: Skinnamarink

Virtual Toddler Storytime: Week 10

Some more spooky storytime stories and rhymes this week! I’m back to baby storytime in November, but I’m already searching for more to retell with toddlers in December! If you ever want to watch these live, we have three live storytimes a week on the Westerville Public Library Facebook Page on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 9:30 am. My next storytime is for the babies on Tuesday at 9:30 am.

More Toddler Storytime Content:

Find additional storytime content at the links below:

Storytime Resources (includes all storytime outlines)
Virtual Toddler Storytimes
Virtual Baby Storytimes
Virtual Preschool Storytimes
Virtual Family Storytimes (including themed special events)
All Virtual Storytime Outlines

Toddler Storytime Intro Song & Rhyme

Early Literacy Tip: Make up your own words to familiar tunes to create silly songs. Let your child choose unique animals for “Old McDonald Had a Farm” and unique actions for “If You’re Happy and You Know It.”

Book Recommendation: The Ghosts Went Floating by Kim Norman (abbreviated)

Amazon.com: The Ghosts Went Floating (9780374312138): Norman, Kim, Fleck,  Jay: Books

Song: Can You by The Wiggles

Fingerplay: Five Little Pumpkins

— Find more Fingerplays in this post. —

Retelling: The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams

— Find more Book Retellings in this post. —

Action Rhyme: Horns and Fangs

Magnet: Five Little Bats

— Find more Flannel & Magnet Activities in this post. —

Manipulative: Shakers (If All of the Raindrops by Old Town School of Folk Music)

Closing Song: The Popcorn Song by Laura Doherty

:)